UEFA Euro 2020 [2021] Stadiums

UEFA Euro 2020 [2021] Stadiums

The first European title was won by the Soviet Union, who defeated Yugoslavia 2-1 at Paris Saint-Germain's Parc de Princes in 1960 in front of a paltry 18,000 people.

Euro 2020 [2021] represents the 16th incarnation of the tournament played in 13 different countries and won by 10 other nations.

The Euro 2016 finals were again be held in France for a record third time.

The 2021 finals are the first to be held with no fixed host, with matches played across the continent.

In this article, you will find our Euro 2020 stadium guides where the matches of Euro 2020 will be played during the pan-European tournament.

In 2024 the Euros will revert back to one country, Germany. For now, let's take a look at the tournament happening this summer.

Read our complete guide to Euro 2020 [2021] here.

UEFA Euro 2020 stadium facts

Teams: 24

Playing venues: 12

Matches: 51

Opening match: Stadio Olimpico, Rome

Final: Wembley Stadium, London

Largest venue: Wembley Stadium (90,000 seats) in London

Smallest venue: Parken (38,000 seats) in Copenhagen

London, United Kingdom (England)

Wembley Stadium | Capacity: 90,000 | Opened: 2007

Wembley Stadium connected is the national stadium of England and the home of English football. With 90,000 seats, it is the largest sports venue in the UK and the second-largest stadium in Europe.

Matches:

3x Group D games

1x Round of 16 game

2x Semi-Finals

Final


Rome, Italy

Stadio Olimpico | Capacity: 73,000 | Opened: 1953

The Stadio Olimpico is located within the Foro Italico sports complex, north of Rome. The Italian National Olympic Committee own the stadium and is primarily used for the Azzuri.

Matches:

1x Opening game Group A

2x Group A games

1x Quarter-Final


Munich, Germany

Allianz Arena | Capacity: 75,000 | Opened: 2005

The Allianz Arena replaced Munich's old Olympiastadion, opening in 2005. Allianz Arena is unique in that its facade consists of the largest membrane shell in the world.

Matches:

3x Group F games

1x Quarter-Final

Baku, Azerbaijan

Baku Olympic Stadium | Capacity: 65,000 | Opened: 2015

Baku Olimpiya Stadionu (Baku Olympic Stadium), also known as Baku National Stadium, was built to provide Azerbaijan with a world-class venue suitable for hosting football and athletics events.

The stadium was built to host the 2015 European Games and become the Azerbaijan national football team's home. Previously, Azerbaijan played their games at Tofig Bakhramov Stadium.

Matches:

3x Group A games

1x Quarter-Final


Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation

Saint Petersburg Stadium | Capacity: 56,000 | Opened: 2017

Krestovsky Stadium is a retractable roof stadium with a retractable pitch in the western portion of Krestovsky Island in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

The stadium is the home for FC Zenit Saint Petersburg and has a 79m-high, seven-storey building with a massive dome, with the roof held by eight large masts.

Matches:

3x Group B games

1x Quarter-Final


Budapest, Hungary

Puskas Ferenc Stadion | Capacity: 68,000 | Opened: 2019

The Puskás Arená is the new national station of Hungary that replaced the old Puskas Ferenc Stadion, the Hungarian national team's home since 1953.

The Puskas Arena officially opened on 15 November 2019 and has been selected to host the 2022 Europa League final.

Matches:

3x Group F games

1x Round of 16 game

Bucharest, Romania

Arena Nationala | Capacity: 56,000 | Opened: 2011

Arena Nationala, or just the National Arena, is the Romanian men's football team's home. However, it is occasionally used to host the matches of both Dinamo and Steaua Bucharest.

Matches:

3x Group C games

1x Round of 16 game

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Johan Cruijff Arena | Capacity: 54,000 | Opened: 1996

Johan Cruijff ArenA (formerly Amsterdam ArenA) is the home of AFC Ajax football club. The largest sporting stadium in the Netherlands hosts the international Netherlands international games and significant concert/dance events.

Matches:

3x Group D games

1x Round of 16 game

Bilbao, Spain

Estadio San Mames | Capacity: 53,000 | Opened: 2013

San Mamés (also known as Nuevo San Mamés or San Mames Barria) is located in Rafael Moreno Pitxitxi Kalea, Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain. Opened in September 2013, the stadium replaced the "old" San Mamés as the home of Athletic Bilbao.

Matches:

3x Group E games

1x Round of 16 game

Glasgow, United Kingdom (Scotland)

Hampden Park | Capacity: 52,000 | Opened: 1903

Located in Glasgow, UK, Hampden Park is the home of Queen's Park F.C. and the Scotland national football team.

Hampden Park was built in 1903, although the original stadium has long been built over. Hampden celebrated its centenary in October 2003.

Matches:

3x Group D games

1x Round of 16 game

Dublin, Ireland

Aviva Stadium | Capacity: 50,000 | Opened: 2010

The stadium is the home of Irish national teams, not only football but rugby union too.

The Aviva Stadium was built on the old Lansdowne Road Stadium place, at the time, one of the world's oldest stadiums when it was demolished. The Aviva Stadium opened in early 2010.

Matches:

3x Group E games

1x Round of 16 game


Copenhagen, Denmark

Parken | Capacity: 38,000 | Opened: 1992

Telia Parken, known as Parken Stadium, is the largest football ground in Denmark and is home to Danish Superliga team FC Copenhagen and the National Football Team. With a capacity of 38,065, the 1992 built ground is rated as a four-star stadium by UEFA.

Matches:

3x Group B games

1x Round of 16 game

 


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